Games

Published on February 19th, 2014 | by Edwin Millheim

Singing in Bandfuse: Rock Legends

Singing in Bandfuse: Rock Legends 

As more DLC starts to come in for Bandfuse: Rock Legends, we at Impulse Gamer can’t help but to see the incredible experiences and promise of some rocking good times the game has for friends.

While at the core of the game it pushes the guitar and bass, we cannot forget the little tid bit that really opens the game up to such band experience coolness. It’s a logical combo for vocals to be in a fun learning game which tugs on all of our secret desires to rock out.

While there are only four videos concerning vocals in the game when it comes to learning, the game only gives you the gloss over of vocals. It’s pretty clear that the game is mainly geared towards the stringed instruments at this time. The videos can be found in Shred U.

BandfuseBOX

We hope that like the other tracks, and backing tracks for guitar and bass, that the developers will not forget the vocal end of things and leave it alone in the dark. It would be nice to see perhaps even some literal Karaoke tracks even.  After all we see some forms of backing tracks for the string instruments….maybe a little karaoke where there is the music and maybe backup vocals, and of course the words…but the singing is all you.  This in itself would go a long way to bring it further towards that full interactive friends rocking out for an evening get together of music and song fun.

Even now at this time in its infant stage Bandfuse: Rock Legends has a goodly amount of songs we can test our vocals out on. Not all of which are within everyone’s vocal range though.

The game interface shows something pretty cool at the top of the guide notes as they are coming across to the note or vocal anchor for the vocalist….it shows the pitch and the octave at the top of the screen of each verse and part of the song.  It shows it as Letter and number combinations.  The letter being the Pitch and the number is the Octave Register.

Bandfuse vocals

There are three parts to the vocals pitch marker: a long line, two short lines, and an arrow. The long line and arrow will always follow your dominant pitch, but the short lines will show +/-1 octave. You want to line up one of the short lines with the pitch guide.

Bandfuse Singing

Much like the rest of the game, it scores accordingly on how well you sing the song. Measuring pitch and timing, as well as the octave. The game does not punish you for not hitting the higher or in some cases lower notes in a song. In fact it still scores you even if you sing in a lower octave or even a higher octave.

I got a further update from our source from the Bandfuse: Rock Legends camp detailing more on the Vocals part of the game…..

  • every song supports Karaoke singing (you + backup, no original vocalist) in a few different options: Karaoke instrument (last instrument in the list) with Ducking enabled = you + backup singers + 30% of original singer [some people are more confident using this] Karaoke instrument with Ducking & Pro enabled = just you + backup singers using karaoke highway (no score) [just like a regular karaoke machine]

    Vocals instrument on Level 5 with Ducking enabled = just you + backup singers using the scrolling scored vocals highway Vocals instrument on Level 5 with Ducking & Pro enabled = just you + backup singers using the Karaoke highway, but you get a score at the end

    If you disable Ducking or are on level 1 through 4, the original vocalist will be present at 100% volume.

    Ducking and Pro Mode are toggled in Quick Rig -> Song Settings

You will get your Karaoke fix on, and its good practice for a vocalist anyway…and it’s fun to boot.

Have fun, play games… rock on!

Edwin Millheim  United States Editor , Impulse Gamer


About the Author

whitelotus@aol.com'

Edwin Millheim is a freelance writer since the 1980's has worked in comic book scripting and story writing, for such magazines as Shadis magazine, Anime A2. and also has worked on role playing game creation and adventure creation in the role playing industry as a freelancer (For such companies as Hero Games ,Palladium Books Rifts Index and Adventures Vol 1 hook line and sinker story contributor) working over the years with his editor and co writer for many projects, Donna Millheim, his wife, together... wrote the "electronic games" article for Funk And Wagnalls Encyclopedia Edwin has also worked as writer on comic adaptations to some of his writer/created role-playing games such as Bright Future (Sci Fi) and Unknown Eagles (Based in World War II), and Moonsfar: Warrior's Creed.(Sword and Sorcery) Released Ebook on Amazon 'Unknown Eagles Special Operations" in 2014. Edwin has worked on articles ranging from, previews, reviews and interviews, for various media over the years including magazine and internet, and pod casts, video media shows. Currently the United States Editor For www.impulsegamer.com Over the years Edwin with his often co writers Wife Donna Millheim and Daughter Shael Millheim have written well over 400 articles and reviews and various role playing game books and game supplements. Edwin Millheim is also an actor and stage combat stunt fighter, and has been acting in shows and productions since 1989. Edwin has an over 22-year background in Whitelotus kungfu, a mix of northern and southern Shaolin. Bringing those skills to film and live action stunt shows was a natural thing. Over the years, he has been Cast Coordinator for interactive shows, as well as stunt and fight and action coordinator for various film projects (Sanctuary film from NiceWonderFilms) (BFF Zombie from LifePlay Productions) (Hunter X from Jab Haus)and live action stunt shows. Edwin has had many featured parts as a stunt fighter/actor, and has choreographed hundreds of hours worth of scenes over the years.



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