Iron Sky Movie Review - www.impulsegamer.com -

Iron Sky

    Reviewed by Andreas Wong on May 7th, 2012
    Hoyts
presents a film directed by Timo Vuorensola
    Screenplay by Michael Kalesniko and Timo Vuorensola
    Starring:
Julia Dietz, Gotz Otto and Christopher Kirby
    Running Time:
93 mins
    Rating: M
    Released: May 17th, 2012


2/10

 

 

It is the year 2018. Sarah Palin is the incumbent president of the United States of the Americas. As part of a harebrained re-election campaign, she launches two astronauts, one of them being a black male model named James Washington (Christopher Kirby), over to the dark side of the moon. Washington’s partner discovers a mine for a mysterious element known as Helium-3 before a Nazi sentinel quickly murders him. Washington tries to flee but gets captured. As it turns out, the Nazis relocated to the moon and built a colony after Hitler’s totalitarian regime collapsed in 1945. The Nazis spare Washington so that they can use him to reach Palin. They also use his smartphone to charge up their titanic aerial spacecraft, the Gotterdammerung. However, after the phone’s battery drains, they are forced to dispatch their top soldier, Klaus Adler (Gotz Otto), and his future wife-to-be, Renate Richter (Julia Dietz), an Earth specialist, out to the U.S to obtain another energy source. Palin, who is desperate to find the perfect solution for her re-election woes, uses Adler and Richter to formulate a successful Nazi-themed re-election campaign, unaware of Adler’s secret plans to annihilate the U.S populace, eliminate Fuhrer Kortzfleisch (Udo Kier) and install himself as the next leader of the lunar Nazis. The ensuing chaos, in short, leads to an all-out intergalactic war, conceived as an obvious prism for America’s foreign affairs and a vehicle for the film’s satiric geopolitical critique, if that.

 
Timo Vuorensola’s Iron Sky is a fantastical farce with otiose caricatures, sophomoric political humour and repulsive genre fusion. It recalls, in parts, an eclectic range of films including for instance, Trey Parker’s Team America: World Police (2004), for the thematic angles it uses, Jason Eisiner’s Hobo with a Shotgun (2011), for the nausea that its defective execution and dystopian aesthetic induce, Tommy Wirkola’s Kill Buljo (2007), for the bemusing and deadening satiric humour that undoes its bid to besmirch its intended target(s) and Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds (2009), for its manipulative representations of the Nazi imaginary. Sci-fi, geopolitical, cultural, futuristic and historic tropes all jostle for the viewer’s attention without conveying anything meaningful. Even if the film’s criticism of America’s tragicomic political history and megalomaniacal self-image is somewhat recognisable as its overriding thesis, its flexuous narrative arc works against its goal and its arbitrary conclusion dulls its impact completely. To an extent, the film can be forgiven for its committed lunacy, seeing as its entire premise is built towards excess as opposed to restraint, however, the lunacy itself is not justified owing to the film’s infinitesimal payoff. An execrable effort that should be avoided by all means necessary.






 
 



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