Catastrophe DVD Review - www.impulsegamer.com -

Feature 5.0
Video 5.0
Audio 6.0
Special Features   0.0
Total 5.5
Distributor: Madman
Running Time: 300 Minutes
Classification:
 PG
Reviewer: Hannah Lee

5.5


Catastrophe

The British documentary series Catastrophe will either make you wonder why you didn’t keep up those fascinating science classes, or remind you why you were one of the kids who fell asleep in the back of the class. While the interesting ideas that are hurtled around in Catastrophe hold significance to our historical and scientific understanding of how our Earth came into being, such valuable and mind-boggling stories can fly over the heads of some audience members like lost meteorites as the execution of the documentary surprisingly lacks a strong sense of inventiveness or imagination that distinguishes it from every other science video you may have come across back in high school.

Introduced by Tony Robinson as “the story of our planet’s difficult birth”, Catastrophe is a highly involved investigation that follows the process of evolution on Earth as a result of violent and fatalistic catastrophes of chance. Over the course of five feature length episodes, we follow a clock of our Earth’s history that continues to tick across billions of years that cover global change caused by outer space collisions, ice ages, volcanic explosions, and other critical impacts that have brought us close to extinction, but also contributed to the blossoming of life.

The ideas that Catastrophe investigate are larger than life, and in that respect, it deals with interesting scientific discoveries and ways of understanding our existence. The documentary series, however, fails to be wide-reaching in its appeal, relying too heavily on these big ideas and failing to make greater leaps towards being creative in how they present the bulk of information. While the series is necessarily reliant on CGI to illustrate the cataclysmic changes that took place on Earth’s surface and the prehistoric creatures that roamed it before we did, Catastrophe lacks a distinctive or original take on these stories, making the episodes feel a little repetitive even though each of them deal with different topics and times.

For instance, Tony Robinson has the enthusiasm and passion of a science teacher, hell bent on making you appreciate some of the mind-bending studies that have been made in this field of astronomical proportions. But as his narration falls into a predictable pattern and style, Catastrophe turns unengaging as even the 3D imagery and operatic music fail to hold our attention– making it difficult for those who may be new to such ideas of evolution to sustain their interest in the series.

While science geeks and curious documentary fanatics may enjoy Catastrophe for the insightful interviews and CGI renditions of our Earth’s violent beginnings, Catastrophe does nothing to engage those who may have spent most of their science lessons doodling on the desk. Had the series taken a more original approach, or at least a more accessible angle that moved away from a feeling of repetition and predictable visual constructions, it could have converted even the most scientifically uninterested viewer into a mad scientist.






 
 



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