ABYSS: FAMILY ISSUES #2 Comic Review - www.impulsegamer.com -
ABYSS: FAMILY ISSUES #2
Writer: Kevin Rubio/Art: Alfonso Ruiz/Colors: Garry Henderson

 

Review Information

Reviewer: Lyz Reblin
Review Date: April 2011

Comic Information

Publisher: Red 5 Comics

5.0

out of 10

 

When one begins the second issue of a series, there is an expectation like with any sequel, for more of the same but bigger and better. Well, Abyss: Family Issues #2 does provide more of the same, but that is not necessarily better. While my biggest fault with Abyss: Family Issues #1 was the multiple uses of pop culture references, this technique is compounded in the second issue making it nearly impossible to judge the comic on any factor of originality. So much of the book is contrived or borrowed that when there are direct references to other media figures you are almost relieved that the artists of the comic donít try and hide this fact. 

ďEx, Lies, and Videotape,Ē the parodic title of this issue, catches the readers up on not only the first issue of Family Issues, but Abyss in general. The second issue of Red 5 Comicís second outing with these characters follows Eric Hoffman as he tries to reunite with his mother who just happens to be married to Mr. Magic, not his biggest fan. To get more answers, other than those from the enigmatic Pollack, Eric visits his father in jailÖ but gets more than he asked for. 

Iím not going to belabor the point, but anytime you have Victoria Secret model Adriana Lima as a character, your desire to include pop culture references has gone way too far. There is Aquaman and Kristin Bell in the same comic, how is that possible? My point is that this comic relies way too much on recognizable characters from other sources; it feels like one of those Scary Movies flicks. 

As for the artwork, there is nothing particularly bad about it, but nothing outstanding either. It is full of sharp angles and rough lines. Art-wise, the strongest element is the coloring, which explores both dark and light palettes throughout the book. 

According to the end of the book, the character of Eric Hoffman is on Twitter (and I thought I couldnít get off soon enough). There are some sample tweets on the last page, again dealing mainly with pop culture instead of Abyssí own universe. 

It is hard to take this comic seriously, but I donít think the creators are going for that. This is a humorous superhero comic and it does succeed in being funny. But random notes by the editors such as the full-length name of Los Angeles seem random for random sake. It isnít the plot or the characters (the ones the creators made) that annoy me, but the fact that the writer does not seem to trust his own work to carry the story through.  Kevin Rubio seems to believe that by making the comic a meta-text it will make the book stronger, but it just does the opposite. Why would I choose to read a comic that depends on others, when I could read the sources that Abyss is including?






 
 



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