GEORGIA FIELDS - Something Borrowed, Something Blue CD Review - www.impulsegamer.com -
GEORGIA FIELDS
Something Borrowed, Something Blue

 

Review Information

Reviewer: David Murcott
Review Date: October 2010

CD Information

Label: Popboomerang
Running Time:

8.5

out of 10

 

 

In what is possibly the most noteworthy instance of a musician exploiting the percussive potential of barnyard animals, this latest single from Melbourne-based troubadour Georgia Fields features, in addition to crisp piano lines and a hauntingly ephemeral chorus, the odd well-timed oink, quack and moo of a child’s squeaky toy.  The conceit is simultaneously the perfect introduction to a timeless paean, a deceptive and wilful infusion of innocence into what is in actuality a ballad steeped in longing, and a reminder that with everything Georgia Fields does comes an element of uniqueness. 

Fields has been steadily garnering plaudits these past three years or so, building up a solid following largely on the strength of her renowned live shows, which are more often than not accompanied by her 12-piece ‘Mini-Indie-Orchestra.’  Thankfully this lush musicality translates surprisingly effectively to the recording studio, and each of the three tracks on offer here are accomplished, lovingly honed and quietly resplendent.  Fields appears more than comfortable with her not inconsiderable talents and frequently imbues her songs with the freedom to meander across genre lines, usually with results that border on the sublime.  

Both B-sides fit comfortably alongside Something Borrowed, and neither feels like anything  approaching a hastily cobbled cast-off.  In fact, just quietly, I think they might even be superior.  The finely crafted Sinking Relation Ship is a lilting, lyrical acoustic shanty that strongly recalls The Decemberists and combines subversive symbolism (‘My parachute’s made of bricks and mortar’) with cleverly varied percussion and the gentle tinkling of a glockenspiel.  Meanwhile Happy Accidents wraps things up in a string-soaked and beautifully pensive fashion, and as Fields croons the song’s final line she manages to sound both vulnerable and subtly challenging: ‘I dare you to believe we’re more than happy accidents.’ 

More triplet of worthies than a lead track backed with afterthoughts, this enticing, whimsical and eminently listenable release heralds great things for this thoroughly accomplished up-and-comer.






 
 



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