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whatshot Remember Me PS3 Review - www.impulsegamer.com -
Remember Me
Reviewed by
Cameron Grimes
on
Remember Me PS3 Review. As terrible and overused as this statement is, Remember Me is definitely not worth remembering, from a gameplay perspective at least.
Rating:
2.9

Gameplay 5.0
Graphics 8.0
Sound 7.5
Value 5.0
Distributor: Capcom
Rating: M15+
Review Date: June 2013
Reviewer:
Cameron Grimes

5.8


Remember Me
Available on PS3 (Reviewed), PC & XBox 360
 

Remember Me is nothing short of wasted potential; a game with such a strong opening premise and narrative it almost saddens me that it only turned out to be mediocre. Developed by DONTNOD studios, this rather beautiful looking action platformer is let down by uninspiring, complicated combat and a very linear world that leaves the very original story flat. 

You play as Nilin, an Errorist (memory hunter) who has nearly all her memory wiped by Memorize, a corporation who has made it possible for all memories to be stored and shared by its users.  Nilin escapes from Memorize’s headquarters in Neo-Paris, a futuristic dystopian reimagining of the Paris we know today. With the aid of others Nilin must restore her memory and the memories of others to bring down Memorize and squander their plans of total control over people’s minds. 

Remember Me opens with a beautiful cinematic of people talking about how they use SENSEN, the product created by Memorize which allows memory storage. It’s well animated and voice acted, creating a contrast between the rest of the game which shows the chaos that SENSEN has created. 

Neo-Paris is an ugly yet visually impressive world, but the linearity of the environment prevents you from exploring it further, and you’ll definitely want to. Though she’s lost her memory Nilin has a freakish ability to scale walls and ledges, so much so it borders on being ridiculous. It doesn’t help that the camera moves and locks on by itself when you’re completing jumping puzzles, making it disorientating and difficult to work out what button combination is required to jump to the next ledge. I use the term ‘puzzle’ very loosely as the game tells you where to jump and warns you of oncoming dangers well before you are near them. It makes the 6-7 hours of gameplay feel that much shorter. Characters don’t have shadows, a small complaint but the fact they omitted it to protect an already choppy frame rate is disappointing. 

Depending on how well you can adapt to the controls has an effect on the length as well. Early in the game Remember Me throws its combat system at your feet and runs away leaving you, for the most part, to work it out for yourself. The games is all about making and chaining your own combos together; cool ideas in theory but in reality it feels like an alpha build of Batman: Arkham City, which Remember Me is clearly channelling.

On higher difficulties the game is pretty unforgiving when it comes to health and enemies. One of the first beat-‘em-up sections I encountered starts you off with minimal health and expects you to know how to pull off a health regenerating combo right off the bat. A longer and easier tutorial would have been appreciated, because after dying 10 times in the first half hour all the immersion from the beginning of the game was gone.  

Remember Me’s highlight are the memory remix sequences, in which Nilin must access another character’s memories and alter them so another outcome is achieved. While it is certainly different from the rest of the game and games to come before it, every alteration you can make is scripted and necessary so the linearity is still present. A very cool idea, but wasted. 

As terrible and overused as this statement is, Remember Me is definitely not worth remembering, from a gameplay perspective at least. It’s unpolished, unoriginal and can be found done much better in games before it. It’ll be interesting to see where this game goes in terms of sequels (judging by early sales this franchise is already over), because there is a terrific narrative and world lying under the lacklustre surface.    





 

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