The Darkness: Four Horsemen #2 Comic Review - www.impulsegamer.com -

Story 4.5
Art 6.5
Value 9.0
Total 6.7
Publisher: Top Cow Comics
Release Date: 9/29/2010 (US)
Reviewer: Lyz Reblin

6.7


The Darkness: Four Horsemen #2

I said it in my last review, and I’ll say it again. Comics need a rating system. I know Marvel puts “parental advisory” on their comics but unlike the film rating system, you do not know what they are advising you against. For instance, in the recent X-Men vs. Vampires book, the parental advisory was most likely for Wolverine’s language, for there was no gore at all within the story. Also, films’ have different ratings, like PG-13 and R. These different levels could come in handy for those that can handle some amount of gore, but not Saw-like grotesqueness. The second issue of The Darkness: Four Horsemen only made me want every comic publishing company to follow in the footsteps of Marvel. 

But I digress. This tells you nothing about the comic, but more about how much of a chicken I am. The Top Cow comics are great at re-introducing stories and catching up new readers, as I noticed in Artifacts. For those that did not read my review of The Darkness: Four Horsemen, our “hero” Jackie Estacado, is hired by an old-enemy to kill a group of bikers. Unbeknownst to Estacado is the fact that the demonic forces known as the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse possess these bikers.  

Issue #2 picks up right where the last issue ended. Jackie has arrived in Ginsberg, California, which has now been turned into hell on Earth. The Four Horsemen continue to rampage and terrorize the townsfolk. Meanwhile, there are two other forces on their way to Ginsberg: A mysterious girl with glowing eyes who is hitchhiking and a businessman flying in a jet. Not much is known about either of these characters, but it seems that everyone in a suit in this comic is pretty much evil. 

This particular issue is merely a set up for events to come. Not much actually happens action-wise till the very end, where we learn how affective the Darkness is against the Four Horsemen. It did hold my interest; just wish I had been able to hold my lunch. 

Again, the comic is macabre and grotesque. Even when the artist decides not to show what happens to the victims’ of the Four Horsemen, the writer’s description is enough to make you sick. Of course, the artist only decides not to show the results just once, and that is because it would have been too sexually explicit. Sure, violence is okay, but apparently not sex. There is a cartoonish sense to the artwork, but still for me it doesn’t make it any less graphic. 

Writer David Hine’s note at the end of the comic was a nice addition to the book. He explains the mythology of the Four Horsemen and his choices of their look for this particular incarnation. It’s a great insight into the mind of a very off kilter individual. 

I will most likely review The Darkness: Four Horsemen #3, but not willingly. No, the choice is based on professionalism not desire. I may enjoy a horror film every now and then, but I don’t have the stomach for this particular story. It doesn’t even interest me as to how it concludes.






 
 



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