24 Hours - No Party People CD Review - www.impulsegamer.com -
24 Hours
 No Party People

 

Review Information

Reviewer: David Murcott
Review Date: October 2010

CD Information

Label: Maybe Mars
Running Time:

7.0

out of 10

 

 

Formerly known as 24 Hour Party People, this Beijing-based trio have been steadily honing their skills for the past five years and now enjoy a reputation as one of the city’s tightest and most frenetic live acts.  Having joined the ranks of the ever-expanding Maybe Mars roster, this eight-track debut effort was produced by none other than Martin Atkins (Ministry, PiL), who travelled to Beijing in 2008 to sign and record some of the most impressive up-and-comers of the Chinese underground scene. 

The most cursory of listens indicates that the album’s title, aside from referencing the band’s change of name, is entirely tongue in cheek; if there’s one thing 24 Hours know how to do, it’s get the partay started.  An impressive amalgam of alternative pop, razor sharp licks and chirpy bubblegum choruses, all of which often feature in the same song, this 28-minute LP is both spirited and refreshingly free from pretense. Catchy, whimsical standout My Sir is uncannily reminiscent of The Grates, down its cheerily inane chorus of “You can be the one, my sir, you get to hold me now,” and Fuzz opens with a military drumbeat and the chipper accompaniment of a gym whistle, before getting down to business with some muscular riffs and a vocal performance as raucous and energetic as any on the album. Guitarist Ren Yilan channels the spirit of Franz Ferdinand, particularly on Your Song, and the clever interplay of his double-tracked guitars complements the varied approach of bassist/vocalist Zheng Chen, who alternately hoots, howls and harmonises as the occasion demands.   

By all reports Atkins’ production fails to truly capture the energy of the 24 Hours live experience, and some of the songs do come across a little thin in places. While Chen and drummer Li Guanyu do their best to propel things on the rhythm front, at times the bass is all but inaudible and the cymbals come across a little muddy and indistinct. Minor deficiencies aside however, No Party People is a fun and durable debut, and a neat encapsulation of the contemporary Chinese garage aesthetic.






 
 



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