Last Chance to See Blu-ray Review - www.impulsegamer.com -

Feature 9.0
Video 8.0
Audio 8.0
Special Features 6.0
Total 8.0

Distributor: Madman
Running Time: 375 Minutes
Classification:
 G
Reviewer: Felix Staica

8.0


Last Chance to See

The great British TV polymath Stephen Fry (of fame spanning Black Adder to QI) lumbers through exotic wilderness in search of endangered species. There are six animals, each getting its own one-hour episode. Accompanying him is zoologist Mark Carwardine, who did a BBC radio show and book, also called Last Chance to See, back in 1989 with famous writer Douglas Adams.

Fry and Carwardine essentially retrace the steps of two decades earlier to check up on the animals which were at risk then and to see if conservation efforts have paid off. The animals, and episode titles, are: Amazonian Manatee, Northern White Rhino, Aye-Aye, Komodo Dragon, Kakapo and also the Blue Whale.

Many people would say it's hard for Fry not to be charming and infuse any place or situation with charisma. This much is true in this series as well. From the get go, where he is injured most unf0rtunately on the Amazon river, we can't help but look on at his towering awkwardness, especially on boats, as he goes into the wilds of the world's continents and his iPhones (around five) are rendered useless. He does not get along completely fabulously with Carwardine, however. Rather than chumminess, the two men have a proper working relationship and thorough interest in the natural world before them.

Each episode is interesting because of the build up on the way to the see the endangered animal. For example, in “Kakapo”, which is a flightless parrot in New Zealand, we first go in chase of a kiwi, which is also at risk. We also see the two go through quarantine, which is kind of officious and comical. The episodes offer an insight into the people of the country or community where the animals are. There was a wonderful gaze at the Amazon and the people living there. You start to grasp how huge the place is and how important water for life there is.

The shows can be a bit slow-paced, which may cause some people to give in to viewer-fatigue. Sometimes, you can't help but be distracted whilst watching because the full hour is used up. It can't always be gripping TV, I suppose. Sometimes waiting for the kakapo to come out of its hole just can't be sped up.

The use of high-definition cameras gives everything a lavish, stunning gloss. The jungles and mountains seem all that more close because they look so majestic. There is also a lot of hand-held work, for audio too. This gives Last Chance to See a great documentary feel, which is fitting.

There are 21 minutes of unseen footage in the bonus material. I would have loved a kind of info-file on the animals or something similar! I enjoyed this show and it is extremely educative even with the hints of fat that could have been trimmed remaining. 






 
 



   Games
   PlayStation 4
   XBox One
   PlayStation 3
   XBox 360
   PC
   PS Vita
   Wii U
   Wii
   3DS
   DS
   PSP
   Apple
   Casual
   Android
   Classics

  Movies
   Movies & IMAX
   Blu-ray
   Action
   Anime
   Comedy
   Crime & Thrillers
   Documentaries
   Drama
   Family
   Horror
   Kids
   Lifestyle
   Music
   Romance
   Sci-fi
   Sport

   IT
   PC
   Apple
   Hardware

   Information & Fun
   News
   Interviews
   Articles

   Tara's G-Spot
   Loren's Level
   Comics
   Books
   Mind & Body
   Music
   Competitions
   Community
 








 
 




Impulse Gamer is your source for the
latest Reviews and News on Video Games,
Entertainment, Pop Culture, Hardware &
More!

 


© 2001 - 2013 Impulse Gamer
 

 

About Us | Contact Us